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Do it Yourself Business School for Lawyers: Bring in the MOOCs!

If I had the time and capital to invest, I’d partner with Coursera or ApprenNet (Law Meets) and Wharton and build a “personalized” MOOC business training curriculum with wrap-around guides for three or four BigLaw practice groups. I’d hire the best and brightest JDs and KM professionals to write tailored content applying the B-school material to the real world of law practice. Then I’d license this product to premier law firms for a fraction of the cost of a business bootcamp. My client firms would, ideally, assign partner instructors to coach their associates through the curriculum–connecting the dots along the way. Just a thought.

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Be a Twitter Scout and Make Some Rain: How to Use Priceless News & Opinion to Build Your Practice

I am amazed at the number of smart, savvy, competent and competitive friends, colleagues and former partners who have ignored the prodigious power of social media, especially high-end opinion blogs and rapid-information platforms like Twitter, whose purest use is to educate, inform and alert–often ahead of everyone else…..Ultimately, it is bad business to reject efficient new technologies.

What Do Blogging and Vegas Have in Common?? ….Building a Niche Law Practice in the Digital Age

It’s not as easy as it was for me–but much remains the same: Industry and skills specialization is still the fastest and smartest route to practice growth. Client contact, on the client’s turf, is still critical. Developing a reputation within your target industry or practice area still requires vastly more than a thorough understanding of the laws and regulations that affect it.

Too many “B”‘s and soon your entire firm is a B team.

Managing for the Long Term? Invest in Your Associates

Law firms must accept responsibility for the ways in which they have failed their associates, both young and seasoned, and their young partners, setting them up to be set adrift when, inevitably, client demand for high priced legal services began to fall off. As “Legal Rebel” Ed Reeser suggests, in so many words, in a terrific ABA Journal article I read just this morning, law firms need to get back into the “people business”.